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Road to Publication: When the Memoir Goes Meta

What do I mean by a memoir going “meta”? When the book itself is part of the story, and when the process of bringing the book to publication is also the story. (Teaser: I’m going to ask you to vote on a part of my upcoming memoir’s cover.) Committed: A Memoir of the Artist’s Road […]

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Guest Post: Traveling the Publication Road

Enough about my journey to book publication. Let’s hear from another author, novelist Sheila R. Lamb. I first encountered Sheila on Twitter in 2010. We were on the same road, creative writers looking to grow. Since connecting, we both researched, enrolled in, and graduated from low-residency MFA programs. We also both became published authors (well, […]

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Road to Publication: Hurry Up and Wait

After weeks of frantic effort, I returned my revised manuscript for Committed: A Memoir of the Artist’s Road to the publisher a day before its July 1st deadline. And now I wait. I’m learning that in publishing there are deadlines and there are dead times. I met the deadline of providing the publisher a revised […]

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Road to Publication: Killing Your Babies Part Two

A memoirist always runs the risk of offending the living when capturing them in prose. But he also runs the risk of offending them by omission. In Part One of this series I discussed how I have reduced my manuscript of Committed: A Memoir of the Artist’s Road over the course of the last year, in anticipation […]

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Do Authors Need Two Facebook Pages?

It should come as no surprise that since signing a publishing contract for Committed: A Memoir of the Artist’s Road, my mind has turned to marketing. It also isn’t a secret to longtime readers of this blog that while I find Twitter somewhat intuitive, the secrets of Facebook elude me. So I’m pleased to have […]

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Creative Control in the Age of Kickstarter

How much creative control do we cede when other people’s money is involved? Before I get to Kickstarter, let me throw in a historical anecdote. Galilee Galileo was not only the Father of Modern Science, he also earned a decent income from book sales. He was driven enough by profit maximization to eschew writing his […]

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How One Author Combined Personal Essays Into a Coherent Memoir

It is the height of hubris to edit an award-winning creative nonfiction author who also happens to be your mentor. But I decided the brilliant proposed title of Sue William Silverman’s guest post–“E Pluribus Unum: Out of Many (essays) One (book)”–wouldn’t translate well in a tweet. So I’ve imposed a more utilitarian title on this […]

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Envy, Narcissism, Depression and Creativity

Two weeks ago Facebook celebrated 10 years of making us depressed and envious by creating for each user a personalized video not unlike what you see in an Oscars “in memoriam” telecast. It was a wise move by Facebook’s corporate brass to create a video starring ourselves, because academic studies show Facebook encourages narcissism; feeding the […]

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The Linguistic Legacies of Technological Change

It is an annual obsession of ours: What new technological words have been added to the dictionary? When did “email” make it in? How about “tweet”? Of course, making the dictionary may insure a word immortality, but it doesn’t guarantee continued cultural dominance. I use the word “fax” nowadays about as much as I say “defenestration.” (Saying […]

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A Passionate Defense of Journalists

Have you ever, in your line of work, had someone threaten to throw you off a balcony? That happened to a New York City television reporter the other night, and the one doing the threatening was a U.S. congressman. The episode itself–and the congressman’s first attempt at an “apology”–demonstrates a phenomenal misunderstanding of the critical role […]

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